Little Magazine Collection

at UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON

1 note &

There are works of art with great particularity. For a piece of work to live for generations, it doesn’t require the devotion of a million people. It only requires a couple of people to love it strongly.
Junot Díaz, interview by David Naimon in Glimmer Train 91, Fall 2014.

Filed under Junot Díaz glimmer train david naimon art literature

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New arrival: Abraham Lincoln no. 8, edited by K. Silem Mohammad and published in Ashland, Oregon. We like the “little magazine spirit” that exudes from the journal’s stated publication schedule: “Abraham Lincoln is published fairly frequently, then hardly at all, then wham! there it is again.” On the topic of writers’ guidelines, the journal has this to say: “Unsolicited submissions sink ships.” This issue features poetry by Josef Kaplan, Sommer Browning, Sandra Simonds, Sampson Starkweather, and others. And quite a set of glowing big-cat eyes on that cover art.

New arrival: Abraham Lincoln no. 8, edited by K. Silem Mohammad and published in Ashland, Oregon. We like the “little magazine spirit” that exudes from the journal’s stated publication schedule: “Abraham Lincoln is published fairly frequently, then hardly at all, then wham! there it is again.” On the topic of writers’ guidelines, the journal has this to say: “Unsolicited submissions sink ships.” This issue features poetry by Josef Kaplan, Sommer Browning, Sandra Simonds, Sampson Starkweather, and others. And quite a set of glowing big-cat eyes on that cover art.

Filed under abraham lincoln k. silem mohammad oregon literature little magazines josef kaplan sommer browning sandra simonds sampson starkweather poetry literature

1 note &

We’re struck today by this feature “Looking for Marshall McLuhan in Afghanistan,” in Exile v. 38, no. 2, the 150th issue of this Canadian literary quarterly. The feature provides a visual perspective on war with photographs and text by Rita Leistner and illustration by Jason Logan. It provokes thought on armored vehicles, smartphone photography, and how both technologies become extensions of those who use them.

We present it without much comment other than to say that, flipping through the magazine’s pages to check for interviews, we stopped in our tracks, chilled by how timely this feature seems with current news events closer to home, in Ferguson, MO, less than four hundred miles from Madison. It reminds us of the important role that little magazines— and, more broadly, text and image in combination— can play in commenting on, contextualizing, and critiquing the world around us.

Filed under exile photography marshall mcluhan media war ferguson afghanistan war photography rita leistner smartphones jason logan

3 notes &

We are so into this short video by Elizabeth Cornell, which documents her research at the Little Magazine Collection here at UW-Madison Libraries in the summer of 2009, and shows the truly wide reverberations of the little magazines across those bedfellows of art, literature, and science. 

Her research, "The Einstein Phenomenon and 1920s Little Magazines," focused on the role of 1920s American authors in bringing Einstein’s theory of relativity to a wider audience— which brought her to look at mainstream periodicals as well as little magazines.

Cornell says in the video: “Little magazines were an index of current events, as well as cheerleaders for the strange and unexpected, including Einstein’s then-radical-sounding ideas about the universe.”

Filed under elizabeth cornell einstein 1920s little magazines art literature science relativity

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seven-middagh:

How can you not root for a magazine whose motto was “Making no compromise with the public taste”? In 1914, bored with her job at the Chicago Evening Post, Margaret Anderson founded The Little Review, a publication which she intended to be as outré as possible, featuring then-unknown writers and artists alongside editorials defending feminism, birth control, homosexuality, and Emma Goldman. Two years later, Anderson met Jane Heap, an influential member of the Arts and Crafts Movement, whom she promptly fell in love, moved in, and lived openly with. Heap was given the job of co-editor, to which she brought her enthusiasm for modern art, although she herself preferred to stay out of the spotlight, signing her pieces under pseudonyms or as ‘jh’.

By 1918, when The Little Review began serializing Ulysses, it was known as the foremost literary magazine in America, and credited with having almost singlehandedly introduced modernism to the States. Then, in 1921, the U.S. Postal Service began seizing and burning editions, claiming that Ulysses contained obscene material, which, in turn, led to an obscenity trial, a fine, and more stringent levels of censorship. Anderson and Heap broke up three years later, and control of the magazine passing over to Heap, who turned its focus more towards the Surrealist, Cubist, and Dadaist movements, until, eventually, ceasing publication in 1929.

Thanks to some poor intern at either Brown or the University of Tulsa, you can flip through copies of The Little Review here, which I guarantee would be a perfect use of your time (highlights include: casual submissions from the now-legendary authors; outraged letters from the public.)